My Failed Attempt to Start a Business —

I had some extra cash last year and I thought …  Why not become an entrepreneur?  I knew nothing about being an entrepreneur, but I thought it might be interesting, anyway.  So I thought a lot about what I liked that I could sell, and my mind went straight to purses.  I love purses almost as much as I love shoes.  I usually stick with a purse for at least a couple of months, and sometimes only reluctantly switch to accommodate more crap!  Even so, I enjoy purses, so I thought why not open a boutique in the south of Greece on the Aegean and sell reasonably priced but unusual purses?  So in the spirit of entrepreneur-ism I bought about 10 purses I would like to own — to get an idea of my tastes.  Spent about $850.

For a long time, I just sat there and admired the purses I bought, while I envisioned the design of my shop, which would only operate during the summer months.  Ideal, right?  Gradually, I began testing the purses — for how can you be sure about the product you sell, if you, yourself, have not used it?  Then flaws began to emerge.  First and  most important one:  Most of them were overpriced.  Except for the melie bianco ones.  Those were worth their price because they were impeccably put together.  You could see and feel the human touch that went into making them.  Others had design flaws.  A $220 bag had a really cheap-looking brassy clutch on the outside which was heavy and annoying, and soon began to look as cheap as it actually was.

baghaus.com the company I purchased the bags offered no guarantees once sold, despite flaws.  My Buddha bag had a defective zipper.  That sucks.  When you pay around $80 for a bag with such a glaring defect.  This company was totally obnoxious.  I vowed never to buy anything from them again.  Or, when asked, would say exactly what I think of their customer satisfaction policy.

Totally sucks.

baghaus.com.